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The cosmic common good : religious grounds for ecological ethics

Author: Daniel P Scheid
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, [2016] ©2016
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The forces that imperil Earth threaten present, permanent, and dramatic changes for life on the planet. What is the moral vision required to understand Earth's goodness and humanity's place in it? In 'The Cosmic Common Good', Daniel Scheid argues that the cosmic common good provides a common ground for interreligious ecological ethics by affirming (1) an ethical non-anthropocentrism, in which humans are part of the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Scheid, Daniel P.
Cosmic common good.
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2016]
(DLC) 2015016509
(OCoLC)913829518
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel P Scheid
ISBN: 9780199359448 019935944X 9780199359462 0199359466
OCLC Number: 926914912
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Introduction --
Chapter One: The Cosmic Common Good as a Ground for Interreligious Ecological Ethics --
I. Imperiled Earth and Religious Responses --
II. Twofold Approach: Catholic Social Thought and Other Religious Traditions --
III. Outline of Chapters --
Part I: A Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Chapter Two: A Catholic Cosmic Common Good: Overview and Prospects --
I. The Common Good and Human Dignity in Catholic Social Thought --
II. Catholic Social Thought and Cosmic Common Good --
III. Scientific Grounds for the Cosmic Common Good --
IV. Theological Grounds for the Cosmic Common Good --
V. Why a Cosmic Common Good? --
VI. Features of a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
VII. Conclusion --
Chapter Three: Classical Sources for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good: Augustine and Thomas Aquinas --
I. Introduction --
II. A Fivefold Cosmic Common Good --
III. Implications for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Chapter Four: Thomas Berry and an Evolutionary Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
I. Introduction --
II. The Cosmic Story --
III. The Threefold Nature of the Universe --
IV. Implications for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Chapter Five: Earth Solidarity --
I. Solidarity in Catholic Social Thought --
II. The Virtue of Solidarity --
III. Solidarity Expanded: Earth Solidarity --
IV. Dimensions of Earth Solidarity --
V. Conclusion --
Chapter Six: Earth Rights --
I. Rights in Catholic Social Thought --
II. Rights Expanded: Justifications for Earth Rights --
III. Earth Rights --
IV. A Catholic Cosmic Common Good, Earth Solidarity and Earth Rights: Conclusion --
Part II: The Cosmic Common Good and Interreligious Ecological Ethics --
Chapter Seven: Comparative Theology and Ecological Ethics --
I. Overview of Comparative Theology --
II. Comparative Ecological Ethics --
Chapter Eight: Hindu Traditions: Dharmic Ecology --
I. Dharma in Hindu Traditions --
II. Dharmic Ecology: Theocentrism and the Intrinsic Dignity of Creatures --
III. The Atman (Self) and the Transmigration of Souls --
IV. Common Good of Mother Earth --
V. Dharmic Rituals as Embedded Ecology --
VI. Ahim̥sā and Vegetarianism --
VII. Implications for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Chapter Nine: Buddhist Traditions: Interdependence --
I. Pratītyasamutpāda/Dependent Origination as a Cosmological Principle --
II. Pratītyasamutpāda/Interdependence as an Ecological Principle: Thich Nhat Hanh --
III. Pratītyasamutpāda/Interdependence as an Ecological Principle: Joanna Macy --
IV. The Jeweled Net of Indra --
V. Implications for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Chapter Ten: American Indian Traditions: Balance with All Our Relations --
I. Indigenous Traditions and Systemic Violence --
II. Four Features of American Indian Worldviews and Their Ecological Implications --
III. The Lakota --
IV. Lakota Spatiality as Implicit Critique of Amer-European Temporality --
V. Self-Critical Implications for a Catholic Cosmic Common Good --
Conclusion: An Interreligious Cosmic Common Good.
Responsibility: Daniel P. Scheid.

Abstract:

The forces that imperil Earth threaten present, permanent, and dramatic changes for life on the planet. What is the moral vision required to understand Earth's goodness and humanity's place in it? In 'The Cosmic Common Good', Daniel Scheid argues that the cosmic common good provides a common ground for interreligious ecological ethics by affirming (1) an ethical non-anthropocentrism, in which humans are part of the greater whole of the cosmos; (2) both the instrumental and intrinsic value of nonhuman nature; and (3) an integral connection between the ends of religious practice and the pursuit of this common good.
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Given the suffering caused by ecological degradation to humans and other creatures alike, theology is tasked in our day to bring the natural world back into view as a subject of religious and moral Read more...

 
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