Patient, heal thyself : how the new medicine puts the patient in charge (eBook, 2009) [Fuller Libraries]
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Patient, heal thyself : how the new medicine puts the patient in charge

Author: Robert M Veatch
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Robert Veatch, one of the founding fathers of contemporary bioethics, sheds light on a fundamental change sweeping through the American health care system, a change that puts the patient in charge of treatment to an unprecedented extent. The change is in how we think about medical decision-making. Whereas medicine's core idea was that medical decisions should be based on the hard facts of science--the province of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Veatch, Robert M.
Patient, heal thyself.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009
(DLC) 2008003515
(OCoLC)191751571
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Robert M Veatch
ISBN: 9780199718351 0199718350 1282544063 9781282544062 9786612544064 6612544066
Language Note: English.
OCLC Number: 607554825
Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 287 pages) : illustrations
Contents: The puzzling case of the broken arm --
Hernias, diets, and drugs --
Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients --
Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights --
Societal interests and duties to others --
The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants --
Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" --
Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? --
Abandoning informed consent --
Why physicians get it wrong and the alternatives to consent: patient choice and deep value pairing --
The end of prescribing: why prescription writing is irrational --
The alternatives to prescribing --
Are fat people overweight? --
Beyond prettiness: death, disease, and being fat --
Universal but varied health insurance: only separate is equal --
Health insurance: the case for multiple lists --
Why hospice care should not be a part of ideal health care I: the history of the hospice --
Why hospice care should not be a part of ideal health care II: hospice in a postmodern era --
Randomized human experimentation: the modern dilemma --
Randomized human experimentation: a proposal for the new medicine --
Clinical practice guidelines and why they are wrong --
Outcomes research and how values sneak into finding of fact --
The consensus of medical experts and why it is wrong so often.
Responsibility: Robert M. Veatch.

Abstract:

Patient, Heal Thyself is on a theme developed by the author for 30 years, that a radical change is sweeping through the American healthcare system that puts the patient in charge of treatment to an  Read more...
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...engaging and thoughtful ruminations about the current medical paradigm that include interesting inquiries into historial practices and beliefs...a compelling examination of how to catch medicine Read more...

 
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