skip to content
The spirit of contradiction in Christianity and Buddhism Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

The spirit of contradiction in Christianity and Buddhism

Author: Hugh Nicholson
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Hugh Nicholson examines the role of social identity processes in the development of two religious concepts. The first of these is the Christian claim that the Son is of the same substance as the Father, a concept which forms the basis of the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity. The second is the Buddhist doctrine of No-self, the claim that the personality is reducible to its impersonal physical and psychological  Read more...
You are not connected to the Fuller Libraries network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Remote Access Login
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Hugh Nicholson
ISBN: 9780190455354 0190455357
OCLC Number: 945784107
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: Cover; The Spirit of Contradiction in Christianity and Buddhism; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Social Identity and the Development of Doctrine; The Cognitive Science of Religion; Theological Correctness; The Evolutionary Origins of Religion and Parochial Altruism; Social Identity Theory; Environmental Impact on the Doctrinal History of an Intellectual Tradition; Hegemonic Struggle and the Acceptance of Once-​Extreme Positions; Consubstantiality; No-​self; Theology as Rhetoric; Part 1: Christological Maximalism 2. An External History of Christological DevelopmentEvolutionary and Developmental Theories of Christological Origins; Nicaea as a Christological Paradigm Shift; Christology, Christian Identity, and Judaism; The Upward Trajectory of Christological Development; 3. From Messiah to Logos; Jesus as Messiah; Christological One-​Upmanship in the Gospel of John; The Ascendency of Logos Christology: Justin Martyr; 4. From Preexistent Word to Consubstantial Son: The Arian Controversy; The Conflict between Alexander and Arius; Nicaea and the Homoousios Marcellus's Denial of the Son-​According to EusebiusMarcellus and Athanasius; Athanasius' Defense of the Homoousios; From Consubstantiality to Trinity; The Creed of Constantinople and the Exclusion of a Modalist Interpretation of Nicaea; Part 2: Buddhist Selflessness; 5. Anattā in the Pali Canon; The Problem of the Self in Modern Buddhology; Discriminating Insight; The Unanswered Questions; 6. Anātmavāda versus Pudgalavāda in Abhidharmic and Postcanonical Literature; The Kathāvatthu; The Milindapañha; Vasubandhu's "Refutation of the Doctrine of the Person" Śāntarakṣita's "Examination of the Self Theorized by the Vāstīputrīyas" and Kamalaśīla's Commentary ThereonFrom No-​Self to Emptiness; 7. Theological Creativity and Doctrinal Constraint; Summary of the Preceding Chapters; The Spirit of Contradiction and Apophatic Discourse; The Trinitarian Vision of Reality; Dependent Origination as Emptiness; Theological Creativity and the Metaphorical Process; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Responsibility: Hugh Nicholson.

Abstract:

In this book, Hugh Nicholson argues that seemingly counterintuitive and abstract religious concepts, such as the Christian Trinity and the Buddhist concept of No-self, have developed out of social  Read more...
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Nicholson is unquestionably a leader in the field of comparative religion and theology due in part to his penetrating insight into the historical, doctrinal, and rhetorical matrices of the Patristic Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.